Teaching

My teaching experience is broad, and I have consistently taken on new challenges and opportunities for growth. I've taught courses in college algebra, liberal arts math, calculus, linear algebra, discrete mathematics, intro to proof, abstract algebra, and computational commutative algebra.

I have been convinced for a while that the best way to learn is by doing, and thus my courses all involve some sort of active/inquiry-based learning. One of the things increasingly occupying my mind is how to make the switch from the oft-familiar passive pedagogies (e.g., lecture) to a more active pedagogy both comfortable and engaging to the students.

Resources

Active Learning

Mastery Grading

  • The Mastery-Based Testing blog has several posts written with the intention of describing various forms of mastery-based assessment. I am a contributor to this blog.
  • The Mastery Grading Slack Channel is a great place to interact with seasoned veterans and ask questions.
  • Linda Nilson's book, Specifications Grading is a great primer on the history of grades, and proposes an alternative to a traditional, points/partial credit-based course.
  • I have assembled a few Excel spreadsheets (no macros needed) to help manage the information for both traditional and mastery-graded courses.
  • This workbook allows for a student's base grade to be computed based their collective performance in several categories (see, e.g., my tentative Fall 2018 modern algebra syllabus). Their grade is then modified by +/- 1/3 of a letter grade based on some final summative assessment, such as an exam or project.
  • This workbook aids in the tracking of student performance on learning target assessments over the course of a semester. Their best performance on each learning target will be displayed on each category's main worksheet.
  • This workbook is my traditional template.